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Coding

  1. DarrellSimon
    Ice Cream Sandwich Mar 15, 2015

    DarrellSimon , Mar 15, 2015 :
    I'm a 14 year old . Whose learning to code and I'm getting somewhere but I would like to ask the more experienced programmers some questions:

    1. How do you balance your time to learn a substantial amount of code ?
    2. How do you take notes when learning code?
    3. How do practice what you learn ?
    4. How to not get overwhelmed?
    5. How does your phone help you?
    6.What kind of projects are recommended for beginners to take on?

    P.S I want to be a web developer and I would also like to get into app development. But I want to learn web development first then maybe get into app development
     
    Last edited: Feb 26, 2016

    #1
  2. DaxNagtegaal
    Marshmallow Mar 15, 2015

    DaxNagtegaal , Mar 15, 2015 :
    1. html and css aren't code, don't feel too cool for getting those 2... I thought I was the bomb until I looked at even the simplest JS and I was like whattttt... I'm done xD
     

    #2
  3. CasperTFG
    KitKat Mar 15, 2015

    CasperTFG , Mar 15, 2015 :
    I'm only at 14% through my Code Academy tutorial learning Java. It's tough; with family, work, commitments. Sitting down after a long day around 9 pm to stare at syntax is not what anybody asks for.
     

    #3
    Mr. BG, tobes, grav3h3art and 10 others like this.
  4. TeamValor91
    Community Veteran Mar 15, 2015

  5. Crayon128
    Jelly Bean Mar 15, 2015

    Crayon128 , Mar 15, 2015 :
    you probably have the basics of html down but putting just a word or a picture on thee screen doesnt mean anything. Learn Java, or Ruby, or Lua and try to make a working game, like hangman, etc
     

    #5
  6. danj864
    Ice Cream Sandwich Mar 15, 2015

    danj864 , Mar 15, 2015 :
    I do this for a living, so here's my perspective.

    Learning to code (at least to me) is a lot like learning to play a musical instrument. Take about 30 minutes to an hour a day to learn something new and/or practice. If you make it a daily habit, you will pick it up.

    To practice what you learn, think about why you're learning web development. Is there some particular web site you have in mind? This is your opportunity to start coding it, even if it looks like garbage at first. That's how you learn. Look for examples to see how others do it.

    You don't talk about what you want to accomplish. If you want to just develop content for the web, you can get by with just HTML and CSS. Even if you want to do more than that, you still need to understand how those things work.

    If you want to make your web sites more interactive (say you need input validation, or to access a database or some other services in your web site), then you need more of an understanding of JavaScript and one or more web server frameworks, such as ASP.NET or PHP.

    Here's a suggested order of study (just my opinion):

    HTML/CSS
    JavaScript
    jQuery
    Your chosen web server technology (ASP.NET, Ruby on Rails, PHP, etc.)

    From there, you have many, many options, but if you understand these things, you should be able to understand what else you need to know.

    Good luck!
     

    #6
  7. jmconthe1sand2s
    Gingerbread Mar 15, 2015

    jmconthe1sand2s , Mar 15, 2015 :
    Javascript, Java is very different, sorry for being such a nerd. I found Codecademy really great for a introduction.
     

    #7
    mithilmja, mdcoll, Jack97HD and 3 others like this.
  8. Inzun
    Jelly Bean Mar 15, 2015


    #8
    DarrellSimon likes this.
  9. Nyan_
    Jelly Bean Mar 15, 2015

    Nyan_ , Mar 15, 2015 :
    1, you don't. Learn it and then deal with the consequences
    2, Notes are for chums, I'm in Java and C# though
    3, make stuff!
    4, I personally eat my shirts. Its tottaly involuntary, hence I where v neck now.

    You don't just study it to learn it, you make stuff out of it. Don't be afraid to Google it.
     

    #9
  10. awkward_potato
    Lollipop Mar 15, 2015

    awkward_potato , Mar 15, 2015 :
    1. Take time to practice everyday. (like an hour) or just don't balance anything and spend most of your day programming and end up stressing at 12am to finish homework (my habit)
    2. I don't really ever take notes and I don't see how you could take programming notes. Just get in to good practices.
    3. Like @Nyan_ said, make stuff [​IMG]
    4. If you get overwhelmed just take breaks or lessen your time you code and gradually increase it.

    Google is your friend. Make stuff. Try something even if you think it will break, its better than not testing it all all.
     

    #10
  11. pfalvz
    Donut Mar 15, 2015

    pfalvz , Mar 15, 2015 :
    If you have a class at your school then you should definitely take it! I'm taking computer science had no prior experience and now I'll just code for fun in my free time. I find it to be a lot like puzzle solving, so once you start to learn basic algorithms and concepts the languages will come more easily to you.
     

    #11
    DarrellSimon and S0bek like this.
  12. Matt7262
    Ice Cream Sandwich Mar 15, 2015

    Matt7262 , Mar 15, 2015 :
    Good job man!

    By the time I was 13 I knew C++, Java and C# :D

    1. I would say to study the language and learn for about 30 minutes a day.
    2. Just re-write the code you have learnt in your IDE, see if it works and if so, try combining tutorials to practice and make your own programs.
    3. After one tutorial, write the code from the tutorial and see if it works. After a few tutorials, just go ahead and apply what you have learnt to try and create your own code. If it doesn't work, go over a few more tutorials and try again.
    4. Don't study too much at the same time. Only do it bit by bit. Once you have understood what you're currently looking at, then you can take a break, then learn more.

    Web development is good to start at but not good to apply when making apps, they aren't the same in any way. I would suggest doing the basics of Java for Android apps (If you want to do Android Apps), which would help in a lot of other languages. Then once you get really good with Java, you can try making apps in Unity3D or Game Maker Studio etc.. You can apply your Java skills to other languages such as C++ in those programs.

    Good luck :D
     
    Last edited: Mar 15, 2015

    #12
  13. Slyther1
    Ice Cream Sandwich Mar 15, 2015

    Slyther1 , Mar 15, 2015 :
    On a more developmental side of things, though, learn to plan. It's a pain in the *** to try and face a problem without even thinking it through, write the first bits of code that come to your head, and then having to deal with all the consequences later.

    In order to answer your 4 questions, though:
    1. I find learning about programming just as fun of a thing to do as playing video games, so there goes all my time!
    2. I don't. You try and understand what the basics of things are, and try to contextualize. If you just go around remembering how to hacker, you're not gonna get to far. (Bro, do u even hacker?)
    3. Think of something you'd like to create, and create it! I find this to be easier in OOP, since you can have great ideas of how to piece things together, and you learn from the experience!
    4. I really like programming! It's pretty much like a video game: if you like it, you won't get overwhelmed by it, when you otherwise would!
     
    Last edited: Mar 15, 2015

    #13
  14. ayy1892
    Gingerbread Mar 15, 2015

  15. DarrellSimon
    Ice Cream Sandwich Mar 15, 2015


    #15
  16. DarrellSimon
    Ice Cream Sandwich Mar 15, 2015

    DarrellSimon , Mar 15, 2015 :
    I'm learning from home my school doesn't have it.
     

    #16
  17. DarrellSimon
    Ice Cream Sandwich Mar 15, 2015

    DarrellSimon , Mar 15, 2015 :
    Can you explain 2 & 3 a bit more please also some links to great IDE's would be appreciated.
     
    Last edited: May 30, 2015

    #17
  18. Slyther1
    Ice Cream Sandwich Mar 15, 2015

    Slyther1 , Mar 15, 2015 :
    probably not a good idea anyways, last time I tried that (iPhone 3gs, java), I gave up after like 15 minutes of failures lmao

    EDIT:
    Regarding IDE's:
    C/C++: Qt
    Java: Netbeans
    C# and .NET in general, as well as C/C++ (I prefer Qt, though): Visual Studio
    Android: Android Studio

    General code handling/markup languages: Notepad++
     

    #18
    kuhler, DarrellSimon and S0bek like this.
  19. MCMXCIVR
    Ice Cream Sandwich Mar 15, 2015

    MCMXCIVR , Mar 15, 2015 :
    W3schools is not that great, try pluralsight.
     

    #19
    DarrellSimon likes this.
  20. DarrellSimon
    Ice Cream Sandwich Mar 15, 2015