28
Coding

  1. dumbo_dude
    Honeycomb Jul 17, 2015

    dumbo_dude , Jul 17, 2015 :

    14 years old and you know a lot more than me on this subject haha good luck
     

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  2. Deactivated User
    Jul 17, 2015


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  3. DarrellSimon
    Ice Cream Sandwich Jul 17, 2015

    DarrellSimon , Jul 17, 2015 :
    Thanks
     

  4. DarrellSimon
    Ice Cream Sandwich Jul 17, 2015

    DarrellSimon , Jul 17, 2015 :
    Cool :D, I wish my school had code courses .
     

  5. DarrellSimon
    Ice Cream Sandwich Jul 18, 2015

    DarrellSimon , Jul 18, 2015 :
    Do you still code?
     

  6. Deactivated User
    Jul 19, 2015


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  7. XAPAKTEP
    Eclair Jul 19, 2015


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  8. DarrellSimon
    Ice Cream Sandwich Jul 19, 2015

    DarrellSimon , Jul 19, 2015 :
    Hope you do well and succeed
     
    Last edited: Jul 21, 2015

  9. DarrellSimon
    Ice Cream Sandwich Jul 19, 2015

    DarrellSimon , Jul 19, 2015 :
    Perhaps in the future, but Im too young now
     

  10. kreide
    Eclair Jul 19, 2015

    kreide , Jul 19, 2015 :
    Here are my 2 cents to the whole topic of coding. I worked 4 years for a company in Germany programming in C#. But after some time, you begin to realise, that it is a pretty repetitive work. You are getting tasks and apply same patterns you learned some day before.

    Now I am in my sixth semester of Computer Science studies at a university. By now I realised, that coding is just a tool. What is really of interest are the ideas behind the tool. Algorithms and math that make the magic happen. Any engineer can write code. But not any programmer can do engineering.

    As for your questions, the key too almost all of it is simply - a book. I did not know it myself before I was forced to do it in university. You need to get the basics in functional, imperative and object oriented paradigms. The rest is just syntax, so you are basically up to any language.

    Said that, here are my answers:

    1. Try to read a bit every day, e.g. before going to bed
    2. You can make notes and place bookmarks
    3. There are always examples and exercises, you can do those
    4. Well, if you are not into reading, you probably won't
    5. Stackoverflow app
    6. Examples in a book
     

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  11. DarrellSimon
    Ice Cream Sandwich Jul 19, 2015

    DarrellSimon , Jul 19, 2015 :
    I never thought abou the engineering part
     

  12. Topaxi
    Froyo Jul 20, 2015

    Topaxi , Jul 20, 2015 :
    I'm studying computer science at university, so whilst I'm not an expert by any means, I'm happy to give you my views on the the process of learning to code :)

    My time management skills are poor at best, so I might leave this question to more qualified people :p

    Doing my programming learning through uni really helped. I found writing everything down in lectures - even if i never went back to read it again - really helped to commit it to memory. In that vein I'd probably recommend Youtube tutorials and writing down anything you didn't know before, in enough details that someone else would be able to understand it without any prior knowledge. The process of writing it down will help you remember it a lot better than not.

    These two kind of answer themselves. I find it the best to practice by doing projects, as large or as small as you want, from start to finish. Start with small hello world style terminal programs and go from there. One of my early programs was a Python script where you write in seven letters, and it tells you the highest scoring scrabble word you can make using them. Writing simple little utilities like that taught me the basics fairly quickly. Then move onto larger, more complex graphical programs once you have the basic control structures and practices down.

    The best thing about modern programming is being able to break down a program into it's component parts. My favourite program that I've made so far is a gravity simulation program that basically just draws circles on the screen that move around each other like planets. You have one part of the program that calculates how much each circle should move, another part that detects when the user has pressed a button, another that draws each circle onto the screen, etc. Break it down like that into parts, and then do each part one at a time. Code a little bit, test the new bit you made, and then keep coding, keep testing as you go.

    I've never actually used my phone to do any coding stuff. The most I've done is test how a website I made looks :p

    Let me know if you have any questions or if any of that even helped haha, I feel like I was rambling a bit towards the end :p
     
    Last edited: Jul 20, 2015

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  13. WolfpackN64
    Jelly Bean Jul 20, 2015

    WolfpackN64 , Jul 20, 2015 :
    If you know HTML5, why would you need JS?
     

  14. DaxNagtegaal
    Marshmallow Jul 20, 2015

    DaxNagtegaal , Jul 20, 2015 :
    This was a very long time ago
     

  15. WolfpackN64
    Jelly Bean Jul 20, 2015

    WolfpackN64 , Jul 20, 2015 :
    I see, I guess you can do nearly everything for mobile with HTML now.
     

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  16. DaxNagtegaal
    Marshmallow Jul 20, 2015

    DaxNagtegaal , Jul 20, 2015 :
    True.
     

  17. DarrellSimon
    Ice Cream Sandwich Jul 20, 2015

    DarrellSimon , Jul 20, 2015 :
    Yeah it was some good advice, and i like the point you made about coding one step at a time, i always try to do everything at once:oops:.

    Maybe the both of us can find ways to better manage our time;)
     

  18. Ukali
    Jelly Bean Jul 20, 2015


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  19. DarrellSimon
    Ice Cream Sandwich Jul 20, 2015

    DarrellSimon , Jul 20, 2015 :
    Have you tried websites like CodeAcademy and Dash By General Aembly(both free) ,Treehouse(paid)
     

  20. DarrellSimon
    Ice Cream Sandwich Jul 20, 2015